Cons:

Date: May 24, 2018 | Category: blog

Hemp is one of the natural fibre ropes that is commonly used for shibari. It’s generally pricier than anything synthetic, and my understanding is that it’s used a lot over in the US. That’s right, it doesn’t degrade. It IMPROVES. I like green and silver, other people may prefer red and silver, or may be able to shop around online to find a solid colour braid. Reasonably cheap; comes in different diameters and you can get bundles of it for not a bad price, or you can measure off the lengths you want right from the spool. I was in an experimental mood, so I bought some and took it home with me. Wasn’t terribly expensive; maybe 15 dollars for a bundle? No. I’m not actually a dick like that.

If you’ve benefited from or enjoyed what you’ve read, then please check out Rope Bondage The Smart Way, which answers every conceivable question for the beginner, shares my favorite ties and how to use them to best advantage. There are also tips on making uber sexy fun times happen, and real life examples and case studies of rope bondage fuelled awesomeness. Above; undyed five mil tossa jute; below, 6 mil dyed tossa jute. It takes natural fibre dye surprisingly well, given the already existing golden colour. It works well for bedroom bondage, but I wouldn’t put it under heavy load. Due to that same lack of friction as mentioned above, you can’t really use hitches or friction based means to lock off tension the way you can with natural fibre ropes of greater tooth.

Hemp Bondage Rope. Hemp is one of the natural fibre ropes that is commonly used for shibari. There is another type of cotton rope I’ve seen, which I picked up at a Mitre 10 a couple years back for fairly cheap. I’ve included a picture for reference, so you can distinguish between the two. It actually polishes up and becomes shinier and smoother with use. That’s right, it doesn’t degrade. It IMPROVES. Above; undyed five mil tossa jute; below, 6 mil dyed tossa jute.

Tossa is actually a pretty tight lay, which means it needs a bit of extra conditioning or a long period of break in time before it’s really good to tie with, due to that extra stiffness. That said, spending a bit of time breaking in your rope isn’t really that onerous. So I’m going to go into the pros and cons of a few different ropes. And naturally I’ll tell you which are my favorites and why, but at the end of the day I’ll leave you to make up your own mind, based on your own sets of priorities, which may very well be different from mine. There. End post.

I don’t remember exactly how much I paid in NZD, but it was between $150.00 to $180.00 with shipping included. The second lot of jute I purchased (200 metres, 8 mm) cost a lot more, but I was treating myself to a “savings milestone” so I’m not too upset. Research your dye carefully though. Hemp Bondage Rope. What was left wouldn’t be as strong, but it might very well be suitable for bedroom tying. I was in an experimental mood, so I bought some and took it home with me. Depending on the source of your rope, it can be a real pain in the ass of a rope for a beginner, because the knots in what I got from the 1-8 dollar shop compact down like you wouldn’t believe. You can spend ages trying to unpick those things, which leads to swearing and frustration and a general lack of cool. As I’ve only ever seen it in white, that means you should get a good result if you decide to go down that route. Research your dye carefully though.

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